MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL PLAYOFFS

Boston 4 NY Yankees 3

 

NBA PRE-SEASON

Oklahoma City 119 Milwaukee 115 OT

LA Clippers 109 Denver 103

 

NHL SCOREBOARD

San Jose 8 Philadelphia 2

Carolina 5 Vancouver 3

Columbus 5 Colorado 2

Calgary 3 Nashville 0

Winnipeg 2 Los Angeles 1

Toronto 7 Dallas 4

 

HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL-SECTIONALS

Lawrenceburg 3 Franklin County 0

 

ASSOCIATED PRESS INDIANA HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL POLLS

6A

1 Warren Central

2 Brownsburg

3 Penn

4 Carmel

5 North Central

6 Lafayette Jeff

7 Columbus North

8 Center Grove/Avon

10 Valparaiso

 

5A

1 New Palestine

2 Decatur Central

3 Columbus East

4 Bedford North Lawrence

5 Michigan City

6 Whiteland

7 Cathedral

8 Martinsville

9 Zionsville

10 Castle

 

4A

1 NorthWood

2 East Central

3 Marion

4 Mishawaka

5 Angola

6 Fort Wayne Dwenger

7 Mooresville

8 Evansville Central

9 Northview

10 Boonville

 

3A

1 Evansville Memorial

2 West Lafayette

3 Heritage Hills

4 Andrean

5 Chatard

6 Brebeuf

7 Brownstown

8 Gibson Southern

9 Fort Wayne Luers

10 Guerin Catholic

 

2A

1 Western Boone

2 Tipton

3 Scecina

4 Whiting

5 Triton Central/Eastbrook

7 Paoli

8 Shenandoah

9 Bremen

10 Southridge

 

1A

1 Pioneer

2 Adam Central

3 Southwood

4 Sheridan

5 Churubusco

6 North Central

7 Monroe Central

8 South Adams

9 Covenant Christian

10 North Vermillion

 

MEN’S COLLEGE SOCCER

Evansville 1 Lipscomb 0

Bowling Green 3 IUPUI 2 OT

Wright State 3 West Virginia 0

 

MEN’S COLLEGE GOLF

(PURDUE RELEASE)

COLLEGE GROVE, Tenn. – The Purdue men’s golf team played outstanding golf the last two days, but its first-round score was too much to overcome as the Boilermakers finished third at the Intercollegiate at the Grove held at The Grove Club.

The Boilermakers totaled an 11-under par 853 (294-274-285) to finish in third place, four shots behind Liberty (849) and one behind South Florida (852). No. 12-ranked Louisville finished fourth at 4-under par, while Ole Miss was fifth at 6-over par.

The final rounds were a welcome sight for the Boilermakers, who had struggled early in the year. Purdue’s third-place showing was its best of the season and Tuesday’s final round saw four players at even or under-par. Purdue played the final 36 holes in 17-under par 559 (274-285).

Leading the charge once again was senior Timmy Hildebrand, who just missed a share of his first career collegiate title, placing third at 7-under par 209 (70-69-70), one shot behind a pair of Liberty golfers. Hildebrand has now placed no worse than sixth in any of the last three events and has a stroke average of 70.33 and is a cumulative 11-under par already this fall. He has been at even or under-par in eight of his 12 rounds already this year.

 

WOMEN’S COLLEGE GOLF

MEDINAH, Ill. – The Purdue women’s golf team took home a tournament title in

record-setting fashion Tuesday, shooting eight-under par 280 to champion the Illini

Women’s Invitational at the No. 2 Course at Medinah Country Club. The Boilermakers’

54-hole total of 27-under par, 278-279-280=837, is the best tournament in program

history, led by senior Ida Ayu Indira Melati Putri’s career-high individual total of

eight-under 208.

In the three tournament rounds the Boilermakers put together the No. 2, No. 3 and

No. 7 18-hole team scores all-time at Purdue and finished eight strokes better than

the previous 54-hole record, posted in September 26, 2010, at the Mason Rudolph

Championship in Franklin, Tennessee. Putri’s 208 is tied for the fifth-best 18-hole

score all-time at Purdue and her second career mark in the Boilermakers’ top-10.

 

IU EAST ROUND-UP

(IU EAST RELEASE)

VOLLEYBALL

RICHMOND, Ind. – The Indiana University East volleyball team won in four sets

against Ohio Christian University on Oct. 9 in the annual “Red Wolves Wear Pink”

match on Lingle Court.

Final score: 23-25, 25-11, 25-22, 25-14.

IU East wore pink uniforms in support of Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

IU East hosts Carlow University on Oct. 12. First serve is at 7 p.m. on Lingle Court.

 

WOMEN’S GOLF

FLORENCE, Ind. – The Indiana University East women’s golf program went wire-to-wire

atop the leaderboards at the River States Conference Fall Preview.

The Red Wolves won the tournament for the first time in program history, finishing

with a team score of 669 to best runner-up Asbury by four strokes in the 36-hole

event that concluded Oct. 9.

IU East senior Bre Nowak, already a two-time RSC tournament medalist, won the

league’s Fall Preview for the first time. Nowak finished with a 36-hole score of 157

on the par-71, 5,812-yard layout at Belterra Resort.

The event concluded the fall season for the IU East women’s golf program. The Red

Wolves’ conference championship season is in the spring.

 

 TOP HEADLINES

Red Sox hold off Yanks in Game 4, face Astros in ALCS

Eduardo Nunez charged Gleyber Torres’ four-hopper toward third base and whipped the ball across the diamond . Steve Pearce stretched, falling on his chest for a sprawling catch. The umpire signaled: “Out!”

The Boston Red Sox gathered around exhausted closer Craig Kimbrel, hugging and celebrating after the New York Yankees’ two-run rally in the ninth inning fell short.

But wait!

In 21st century baseball, the game doesn’t always end when it seems, hanging in limbo until umpires in a downtown Manhattan replay room agree .

A Yankee Stadium crowd of 49,641 wondered and the Red Sox paused as they watched from the infield in suspended celebration, fixated on the center-field video board.

After 63 seconds that felt like a lot longer, crew chief Mike Winters heard the decision, took off his headset, raised his right fist and made it official: The Red Sox beat the Yankees 4-3 Tuesday night to win the AL Division Series 3-1, setting up a postseason rematch with the World Series champion Astros.

“I’ve been talking about them the whole season, so now we go,” said Red Sox rookie manager Alex Cora, Houston’s bench coach last year. “Best of seven. They know me. I know them. It should be fun.”

J.D. Martinez and the 108-win Red Sox reached the AL Championship Series for the first time since Boston won the title in 2013. A year after losing to Houston in a four-game ALDS, the Red Sox open the best-of-seven matchup against the 103-win Astros on Saturday night at Fenway Park. Houston went 4-3 against Boston this year.

“Awesome to clinch this one,” Red Sox reliever Matt Barnes said, “but we’ve got eight more.”

A New Jersey native who grew up a Mets fan, Rick Porcello held the Yankees to one run over five innings for his first postseason win in 13 appearances. Barnes and Ryan Brasier followed with a perfect inning each to protect a 4-1 lead.

 

MLB Postseason 2018: CC Sabathia says ‘terrible’ umpire Angel Hernandez shouldn’t be calling playoff games.

CC Sabathia was not complimentary of home plate umpire Angel Hernandez after the Yankees lost 4-3 to the Red Sox in Game 4 of the American League Division Series Tuesday.

“He’s always bad,” Sabathia told reporters, via MLB.com. “He’s a bad umpire.”

Sabathia actually stopped his press conference to complain about Hernandez, who had three calls overturned by replay review in the Yankees’ 16-1 loss in Game 3 on Monday.

“He’s absolutely terrible,” Sabathia told reporters, via Newsday. “He was terrible behind the plate today. He was terrible at first base. It’s amazing how he’s getting jobs umpiring in these playoff games.”

According to the Cincinnati Enquirer, Hernandez is in the middle of a lawsuit against MLB saying he was discriminated against for his race. Hernandez, who emigrated from Cuba to the United States, claims in his lawsuit he has been passed over as a crew chief and for postseason assignments throughout his career.

The case was filed in 2017 and was moved to New York on Oct. 1, 2018. 

Sabathia allowed three runs and five hits in three innings Tuesday in what might be his final start in a Yankees uniform. After the first inning he was seen speaking to Hernandez at the plate.

Red Sox starting pitcher Rick Porcello did not agree with Sabathia’s assessment of the way Hernandez called the game.

 

Craig Kimbrel nearly struck by can that lands in Yankee Stadium bullpen

Red Sox closer Craig Kimbrel had a close call with what appeared to be a falling beer can Tuesday as he left the bullpen for his AL Division Series Game 4 appearance vs. the Yankees at Yankee Stadium.

The can landed just a few feet from Kimbrel, who looked oblivious as a New York police officer moved to push him out of harm’s way.

Kimbrel entered the game in the middle of the ninth inning with the Red Sox leading 4-1. He allowed two runs before retiring Gleyber Torres on a game- and series-ending ground ball to third base.

 

Alex Spanos, Chargers owner and businessman, dies at 95

Alex Spanos, the son of Greek immigrants who used a self-made fortune from construction and real estate to buy the Chargers in 1984, died Tuesday. He was 95.

The Chargers announced Spanos’ death. Faye Spanos, his wife, died in August at 92.

After building a nationwide construction empire based in Stockton, his Northern California hometown, Spanos realized a lifelong dream of owning an NFL franchise when he bought controlling interest in the San Diego Chargers from Gene Klein in 1984 for about $50 million. He eventually bought all but 3 percent of the team.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell hailed Spanos as “an American success story, driven by a tireless work ethic inspired by his humble beginnings.”

“Alex became one of the country’s most successful businessmen, but he never forgot his roots and the call to help others,” Goodell added in a statement. “Along with Faye, his beloved wife of nearly 70 years, Alex’s philanthropic and civic contributions touched many lives throughout California and around the country. He was a marvelous friend and partner whose impact on the NFL will never be forgotten. We all benefited from Alex’s compassion, character and zest for football and life.”

Spanos hadn’t been in charge of day-to-day management of the Chargers since 1994, when he turned over the responsibilities to Dean Spanos, his oldest son. Dean Spanos decided to move the Chargers from San Diego to Los Angeles last year.

 

Bregman, Astros break into prime time for ALCS Games 1 and 2

Alex Bregman is getting his wish – the Houston Astros are headed for prime time.

Major League Baseball released the schedule for Games 1 and 2 of the NL and AL Championship Series on Tuesday, and the Astros will play either the Boston Red Sox or New York Yankees on Saturday and Sunday nights.

The Astros played all three of their AL Division Series games against the Cleveland Indians in the afternoon, with Red Sox and Yankees playing exclusively in prime time.

Bregman sounded off about the scheduling decision to ESPN after the defending World Series champions completed a three-game sweep of the Indians on Monday.

“Does Floyd Mayweather fight the first fight of the night, or is he the main event?” Bregman said. “I mean, does Tiger Woods tee off at 8 a.m.? It’s about time the show ‘Stros play on prime-time television, so we’re looking forward to the ALCS.”

Game 1 of the ALCS will be at 8:09 p.m. Saturday, and Game 2 will be at 7:09 p.m. Sunday. Game 1 of the NLCS between Milwaukee and the Los Angeles Dodgers will be Friday at 8:09 p.m., and Game 2 will be Saturday at 4:09 p.m. The schedule is the same as last year, and Houston would have played Game 2 in prime time regardless because it is the only scheduled game that day.

 

Rays extend manager Kevin Cash’s contract through 2024

The Tampa Bay Rays, who won more games than any American League team that didn’t make the playoffs, have rewarded manager Kevin Cash with a contract extension that runs through 2024, plus a club option for 2025.

The 40-year-old Cash had one year remaining on a five-year, $5 million deal he signed when he replaced Joe Maddon after the 2014 season.

The Rays surprisingly won 90 games this year, finishing third in the AL East behind the Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees, despite trimming payroll last winter and purging the roster again in July to transform themselves into a young team with a promising future.

Cash has led the Rays to a 318-330 record over four seasons.

 

Brooks Koepka voted PGA Tour’s top player of the year

U.S. Open and PGA champion Brooks Koepka added to his trophy collection Tuesday when he picked up the Jack Nicklaus Award trophy as the PGA Tour player of the year.

Koepka is the sixth player in the last six years to win the award, the longest streak of different winners since PGA Tour players began voting on the award in 1990.

Along with winning two majors, Koepka said he was most proud of his attitude when he wasn’t playing. He missed four months at the start of the year recovering from a partially torn tendon in his left wrist but then made up for lost time in a big way.

“I was down when I was missing everything,” Koepka said. “I tried to have the most positive spin on it when I was home. It did stink. It was the worst, emotionally tough times for me. Sometimes when I would question it, I kept saying: `I’ll do it. I’ll be fine.’ Good news or bad news, I had positive energy.”

In his fourth tournament back, he was runner-up at Colonial. Three weeks later, he held off Dustin Johnson at Shinnecock Hills to win the U.S. Open for the second straight year, becoming the first back-to-back U.S. Open champion since Curtis Strange in 1988 and 1989.

Two months later, Koepka held off Tiger Woods amid ear-splitting roars on the back nine at Bellerive to win the PGA Championship by two shots. Koepka tied a major championship record by finishing at 264.

He became the fifth player to win the U.S. Open and PGA Championship in the same year, joining Woods, Jack Nicklaus, Ben Hogan and Gene Sarazen.

The tour does not disclose how many votes he received from a ballot that included Johnson, British Open champion Francesco Molinari, FedEx Cup champion Justin Rose, Justin Thomas and Bryson DeChambeau.

Johnson, Thomas and DeChambeau each won three times.

 

Basketball player’s father: Louisville assistant gave cash

The father of a blue-chip college basketball recruit testified Tuesday that an assistant coach at the University of Louisville gave him a secret payment of $1,300 as part of a deal to get the son to sign with the school.

At a criminal trial about corruption in big-time basketball, Brian Bowen Sr. described meeting assistant Kenny Johnson two separate times in 2017 to try to collect cash in violation of school and NCAA rules.

Bowen testified that the first time, he informed Johnson that defendant Christian Dawkins had promised that the coach would help him with paying rent, Johnson was “shocked” and “flabbergasted.” The next time, he said, Johnson handed over $1,300 – reluctantly.

“He made it clear that this was a one-time deal for him,” Bowen said in federal court in Manhattan. “He said Louisville didn’t pay basketball players.”

There was no immediate response Tuesday to a message seeking comment from a lawyer for Johnson, who was never accused of a crime.

The testimony about the recruitment of Brian Bowen Jr. came in a case that prompted Louisville to fire both Johnson and its legendary coach, Rick Pitino. Johnson is now an assistant at La Salle.

Dawkins, former amateur coach Merl Code and former Adidas executive James Gatto, have pleaded not guilty to charges they sought to use under-the-table payments of up to $100,000 from Adidas in exchange for commitments from top prospects to major programs seen as a path to the pros. Their lawyers haven’t disputed that payments were offered, but they argue that the schools never suffered any harm.

 

Bengals at Chiefs on Oct. 21 moved to Sunday night slot

The Kansas City Chiefs got a sixth prime time game when the NFL moved their home game on Sunday, Oct. 21 against the Cincinnati Bengals to the night slot.

The Chiefs are one of only two 5-0 teams, along with the Rams. The Bengals and the Saints are 4-1.

The Chiefs beat the Broncos 27-23 in a Monday night game Oct. 1. They also have a Monday night game against the Rams on Nov. 19, Sunday night games against the Patriots and Seahawks, and a Thursday night game against the Chargers.

Cincinnati had only one prime time game originally scheduled, a 34-23 win over the Ravens on Thursday, Sept. 13. Cincinnati is 6-14 in prime time games since 2011, including 0-5 on Sunday night.

 

Bills sign QB Derek Anderson to mentor rookie Josh Allen

Bills rookie starter Josh Allen is gaining a mentor after Buffalo signed Derek Anderson on Tuesday.

The Bills announced the move Tuesday, a day after Anderson visited the team’s facility. The 35-year-old has a 20-27 record over 12 NFL seasons, and spent the past seven serving as Cam Newton’s backup in Carolina.

Coach Sean McDermott supported the need to add a veteran presence to help groom Allen in discussing the possibility of the Bills signing Anderson a day earlier.

“He’s got some good wisdom stored up in that brain,” McDermott said.

“He’s got a good outlook on the game from an offensive standpoint and understands defenses,” he added. “So there’s a lot of value to it from where we are right now in terms of that quarterback room.”

Allen welcomed the idea of the Bills signing Anderson when the possibility was first broached following a 13-12 win over Tennessee on Sunday.

“I’m not going to turn any help away, for sure,” the rookie first-round pick said. “I know there’s a lot of things for me to improve and grow on, and that comes with repetition and that comes with an extra set of eyes maybe sometimes, too.”

The move comes with the Bills off to a 2-3 start and preparing for a game at Houston (2-3) on Sunday.

Buffalo has lacked veteran depth at quarterback since trading fifth-year player AJ McCarron to Oakland on Sept. 1. That left the Bills opening the season by starting second-year player Nathan Peterman, and Allen serving as the backup.

Allen’s time on the sideline didn’t last long.

The Bills had no choice but to speed up Allen’s developmental timetable by naming him the starter after Peterman faltered miserably in a season-opening 47-3 loss at Baltimore.

 

Giants waive former first rounder Flowers, sign Mihalik

The New York Giants have waived former first-round draft pick Ereck Flowers and signed tackle Brian Mihalik off their practice squad to replace him.

The team announced the moves Tuesday, a day after coach Pat Shurmur said Flowers would either be traded or waived within 24 hours.

Flowers was the ninth pick overall in the 2015 draft. He never lived up to expectations. The Miami product was moved from left to right tackle this season after free agent Nate Solder was signed. He ended up losing that job to Chad Wheeler after two games.

The Giants, who face the Philadelphia Eagles on Thursday night, also signed kicker Marshall Koehn to their practice squad. Placekicker Aldrick Rosas has a sore quad and his status for Thursday is uncertain.

Shurmur said Tuesday that Rosas’ injury is improving.

Mihalik played in 15 games for the Detroit Lions in 2017, starting twice. He has been on the Giants practice squad since Sept. 13.

Koehn was with the Giants from Jan. 1 until his release on Sept. 1. He has played in one NFL game, for Cincinnati at Jacksonville on Nov. 5. He made his only extra point attempt, and had one touchback on two kickoffs.

 

Titans waive WR Williams after big drop against Buffalo

The Tennessee Titans have waived wide receiver Nick Williams after he dropped a potential touchdown pass in a 13-12 loss to the Buffalo Bills.

The Titans on Tuesday promoted linebacker Robert Spillane from the practice squad to their active roster and had waived both Williams and quarterback Austin Davis. The Titans also altered their practice squad by adding linebacker Nigel Harris and removing offensive lineman Coleman Shelton.

Harris played five games with the Los Angeles Chargers, two with the New York Giants and one with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers as a rookie last season.

Williams had a tough performance in the loss to Buffalo on Sunday. He was beaten to the ball on an interception and also had a critical drop in the fourth quarter that cost the Titans dearly.

 

Jaguars sign Jamaal Charles to help while Fournette’s out

The Jacksonville Jaguars have signed former Kansas City Chiefs running back Jamaal Charles to help during Leonard Fournette’s absence.

The 31-year-old Charles worked out for the team Tuesday morning and signed a one-year contract in the afternoon.

The Jaguars (3-2) lost third-string running back Corey Grant (foot) for the season and expect to be without Fournette for several more weeks. Grant was placed on injured reserve, opening a roster spot for Charles.

Charles should be able to pick up the offense quickly and make an immediate contribution Sunday at Dallas (2-3) while playing behind T.J. Yeldon.

Charles spent nine years in Kansas City and played 14 games with Denver last season. He has 7,556 yards rushing and 44 touchdowns, plus 2,586 yards receiving and 20 more scores.

The Jaguars also signed rookie running back Dave Williams off Denver’s practice squad and released first-year back Brandon Wilds, who was a non-factor with the ball and a liability as a blocker.

The team also placed Austin Seferian-Jenkins on injured reserve and promoted fellow tight end David Grinnage from the practice squad to the active roster.

The Jags also signed rookie tight end Pharoah McKever to the practice squad.

 

Texans quarterback Deshaun Watson reportedly dealing with chest injury

Deshaun Watson suffered a chest injury last weekend in the Texans’ 19-16 win over the Cowboys, according to a report from the Houston Chronicle.

The 23-year-old quarterback is considered day to day, the report says.

Watson received multiple big hits in the victory against the Cowboys. He was examined in the medical tent late in the fourth quarter but returned to the field for overtime.

“Dallas was very physical and Deshaun is very physical,” Texans coach Bill O’Brien said about the game. “Obviously, those are plays we want to cut down on and we’re going to work hard to do that going forward because we know that’s not a sustainable way to play to be hit that much. We’re going to work on it and try to improve on that.”

Watson has completed 65.1 percent of his passes and thrown eight touchdowns along with five interceptions in five games this season.

 

Penguins G Matt Murray out indefinitely with a concussion

Pittsburgh Penguins goaltender Matt Murray is out indefinitely with a concussion.

Coach Mike Sullivan said Murray suffered the concussion during practice Monday and reported potential symptoms to the training staff immediately afterward. Sullivan did not offer specifics on the nature of the contact that led to the injury.

This is the third time in his NHL career the 24-year-old Murray has been diagnosed with a concussion. He suffered one in practice last February and missed nearly a month. He also suffered a concussion late in the 2015-16 season when he collided with Philadelphia’s Brayden Schenn.

Sullivan said the team is focusing on Murray’s health and not the number of concussions he has suffered.

“It’s really hard to make any sort of, to draw any conclusions with this stuff because I think everybody is different,” Sullivan said. “That’s been my experience in dealing with concussions over the years. The nature of these is different. Sometimes players bounce back extremely quick and others tend to linger and it’s hard to predict.”

Murray, who won a pair of Stanley Cups with the Penguins in 2016 and 2017, struggled during the opening week of the season. He allowed six goals in an overtime victory over Washington and then let in five in a loss to Montreal. Sullivan was quick to spread around the blame for Pittsburgh’s sluggish start, pointing to a group that played sloppy away from the puck.

 

When does 2018-19 NBA season start? Schedule, first game for each team

The return of NBA action is right around the corner. The 2018-19 season will tip off on Tuesday, Oct. 16 on TNT. 

Tuesday, Oct. 16

Time  Teams  Location  Natl. TV
8 p.m. 76ers at Celtics  TD Garden  TNT
10:30 p.m. Thunder at Warriors  ORACLE Arena  TNT

 

Wednesday, Oct. 17

Time  Teams  Location  Natl. TV
7 p.m. Bucks at Hornets  Spectrum Center 
7 p.m. Grizzlies at Pacers  Bankers Life Fieldhouse 
7 p.m. Heat at Magic  Amway Center 
7 p.m. Nets at Pistons  The Palace of Auburn Hills 
7:30 p.m. Cavaliers at Raptors  Air Canada Centre 
7:30 p.m. Hawks at Knicks  Madison Square Garden 
8 p.m. Pelicans at Rockets  Toyota Center  ESPN
8:30 p.m. Timberwolves at Spurs  AT&T Center
10 p.m. Jazz at Kings  Golden 1 Center 
10:30 p.m. Mavericks at Suns  Talking Stick Resort Arena ESPN
10:30 p.m. Nuggets at Clippers  STAPLES Center 

 

Thursday, Oct. 18

Time  Teams  Location  Natl. TV
8 p.m. Heat at Wizards  Capital One Arena 
8 p.m. Bulls at 76ers  Wells Fargo Center  TNT
10:30 p.m. Lakers at Trail Blazers  Moda Center  TNT

 

 

Five-star wing Wendell Moore picks Duke over UNC, NC State, Wake Forest

Five-star wing Wendell Moore, the No. 23 prospect in the class of 2019 and top player in North Carolina, per 247Sports, committed Monday to Duke, over other in-state programs North Carolina, NC State and Wake Forest.

“It’s always been a dream of mine, ever since I was little, Duke has always been my favorite school,” Moore told 247Sports. “So when I was there I was just thinking that, that could be me wearing that Duke jersey and it was a surreal moment.”

 

SPORTS EXTRA

TODAY IN SPORTS HISTORY

1908 – Baseball Writers Association forms.

1920 – Cleveland Indians’ Bill Wambsganns makes first unassisted World Series triple play (World Series #17).

1920 – Cleveland Indians’ Elmer Smith hits the first World Series grand slam (World Series #17).

1920 – Chicago Cardinals play first APFA game, a 0-0 tie.

1921 – NFL Decatur Staleys become Chicago Staleys, win 14-10.

1923 – New York Giants and New York Yankees become first teams to play each other for three consecutive World Series, also first played at Yankee Stadium (World Series #20).

1924 – Washington Senators win their first World Series beating New York Giants in 7 (World Series #21).

1926 – Saint Louis Cardinals beat New York Yankees, 4 games to three in 23rd World Series.

1931 – AJ Bennett hits H Garbarino for first scoring pass in Canada’s Big 4.

1931 – Saint Louis Cardinals beat Philadelphia Athletics, four games to three in 28th World Series.

1937 – New York Yankees beat New York Giants four games to one in 34th World Series.

1945 – Detroit Tigers beat Chicago Cubs, 4 games to 3 in 42nd World Series.

1951 – New York Yankees beat New York Giants four games to two in World Series, Joe DiMaggio’s final game (World Series #48).

1957 – Milwaukee Braves beat New York Yankees, 4 games to 3 in 54th World Series.

1960 – Ron Stewart of Ottawa Rough Riders rushes for Canadian Football League-record 287 yards.

1964 – (to October 24) The Games of the XVIII Olympiad are held in Tokyo, Japan.

1968 – Detroit Tigers beat Saint Louis Cardinals, 4 games to 3 in 65th World Series.

1968 – Saint Louis Cardinals’ pitcher Bob Gibson sets mark for total strikeouts in a World Series, 35.

1971 – First game played at Philadelphia’s Veteran Stadium, Philadelphia Phillies win 4-1.

1973 – In the fifth and deciding game, the New York Mets win the National League pennant beating the Cincinnati Reds, 7-2.

1976 – Greece’s 98-year-old Dimitrion Yordanidis is oldest man to compete in a marathon; he finishes in 7:33.

1976 – New Jersey Meadowlands’ (New York Giants) Stadium opens.

1979 – Quebec Nordiques’ Real Cloutier sets NHL record of a hat trick in first game.

1980 – New York Yankees lose 4-2 and are swept by Kansas City Royals in the American League Championship series.

 

TODAY IN BASEBALL HISTORY

1904      Pilgrims right-hander Bill Dinneen, starting on the last day of the season on one-day’s rest, beats Highlander hurler Jack Chesbro when the 41-game winner uncorks a ninth-inning wild pitch, snapping a 2-2 tie to give the team their second consecutive American League pennant. Boston’s Big Bill finishes the campaign completing every game he started during the season, throwing 337.2 consecutive innings without being relieved during his streak of 37 consecutive complete games.

1920      Indians’ Bill Wambsganss becomes the only player in World Series history to complete an unassisted triple play when he makes a leaping catch, steps on second base, and then tags the runner arriving from first base. After the play, a dead calm engulfs Cleveland’s League Park as the hometown fans try to digest what they had just witnessed.

1920      Outfielder Elmer Smith becomes the first player to hit a grand slam in World Series history when the Indians defeat the Robins and Burleigh Grimes, 8-1. In the same game, Jim Bagby becomes the first pitcher to hit a home run in World Series history.

1923      In the first postseason game ever played at Yankee Stadium, veteran Giants outfielder Casey Stengel becomes the first player to hit a World Series homer in the Bronx ballpark, breaking a 4-4 deadlock in the top of the ninth inning with an inside-the-park round-tripper off Joe Bush. The Game 1 matchup is the first Fall Classic contest to be broadcast nationally.

1924      With the score tied at 3-3 and one out in the bottom of the 12th in Game 7 of the World Series, Senators’ backstop Muddy Ruel lifts a high catchable foul pop-up which Giant catcher Hank Gowdy misses when he stumbles over his own mask. Given a second chance, Ruel then doubles and eventually scores the winning run, making the Senators World Champs.

1948      The largest crowd ever to attend a World Series game, 86,288 fans, jam into Cleveland’s Municipal Stadium to witness a showdown between two future Hall of Famers. Braves’ southpaw Warren Spahn beats Bob Feller and the Indians in Game 5 of the Fall Classic, 11-5.

1951      In Game 6 of the Fall Classic, the Yankees become World Champions for the 14th time in franchise history when they beat the Giants, 4-3. The Bronx Bombers’ big blow is a three-run triple hit by Hank Bauer off Dave Koslo in the sixth inning.

1956      In Game 7 of the World Series, Johnny Kucks, allowing just three singles, blanks Brooklyn, 9-0, to give the Yankees their 17th World Championship in franchise history. In the last postseason game played at Ebbets Field, the 24 year-old right-hander ends the game by striking out Jackie Robinson, which turns out to be the Dodger infielder’s final major league at-bat when he decides to retire after being traded to the Giants in the off-season.

1957      With a 5-0 victory over the defending World Champions in Game 7 at Yankee Stadium, Milwaukee wins its first World Series championship since the ‘Miracle Braves’ won the title in 1914 representing Boston. The Most Valuable Player of the Fall Classic is right-hander Lew Burdette, who hurled three complete game victories, including today’s shutout.

1957      Starting Game 7 on just two days rest, Lew Burdette pitches the Braves to a World Championship as he blanks the Bronx Bombers at Yankee Stadium, 5-0. The 30 year-old right-hander, named the Series MVP, tosses 24 consecutive scoreless innings and posts a 0.64 ERA in his three Fall classic victories.

1962      In Game 5 of the World Series, Tom Tresh belts an eighth-inning homer off Jack Sanford to give the Bronx Bombers a 5-3 comeback win over the Giants at Yankee Stadium. The rookie shortstop’s dad, Mike Tresh, who hit only two home runs in his dozen big league seasons, prior to the at bat left his seat behind home plate and moved to the standing-room section in Yankee Stadium, hoping to bring his son good luck.

1963      The Mets announce the club has ‘traded’ coaches with the Giants, bringing Wes Westrum to New York in exchange for Cookie Lavagetto, who is recovering from a serious illness and asked to be moved nearer to his home in Oakland. Mets manager Casey Stengel met and became fond of his new coach during the recent All-Star Game, and will be replaced by him as the team’s second skipper in franchise history when the 75 year-old ‘Old Perfessor’ retires in 1965.

1964      At Yankee Stadium, Mickey Mantle, facing Barney Schultz, slams the first pitch of the bottom of the ninth inning out of the Bronx ballpark, giving New York a dramatic 2-1 walk-off victory and two games to one advantage over St. Louis in the Fall Classic. ‘The Mick’s’ game-winning round-tripper, his 16th Fall Classic round-tripper, breaking the previous mark set by Babe Ruth, makes him the fifth major leaguer to end a World Series game with a home run.

1968      Bob Gibson goes the distance in his eighth consecutive World Series game, losing Game 7 to Detroit, 4-1. The only time the St. Louis Cardinal right-hander, who will compile a 1.89 postseason ERA, didn’t finish a Fall Classic contest was in his first appearance in 1964 when he tossed eight innings against the Yankees.

1968      In the fifth inning of Game 7 of the World Series, Dal Maxvill pops out to first base, becoming the first major leaguer to go 0-for-22 in the Fall Classic. The Cardinal shortstop surpasses the single series infamous mark previously shared by Gil Hodges (1952 – Dodgers), Red Murray (1911 – Giants), Billy Sullivan (1906 – White Sox), and Jimmy Sheckard (1906 – Cubs).

1968      Cardinal fireballer Bob Gibson sets the mark for total strikeouts (35) in a World Series, but loses the seventh and deciding game to Tigers, 4-1.

1970      In the first World Series game to be played on artificial turf, Boog Powell, Ellie Hendricks, and Brooks Robinson homer to power the Orioles past the Reds, 4-3. Baltimore’s offensive output in Game 1 of the Fall Classic overcomes Cincinnati’s 3-0 early lead at Riverfront Stadium.

1973      In the fifth and deciding game, the Mets win the National League pennant, beating the Reds, 7-2. Tom Seaver bests Jack Billingham in the Shea Stadium showdown.

1973      During oral arguments being heard by the Supreme Court, Potter Stewart is handed a note with the startling news that Vice President Agnew had just resigned. The note also informs the glum Republican Justice, a big Reds fan, that the Mets are ahead of Cincinnati in the NLCS, 2-0.

1976      The Royals gain their first postseason victory in franchise history when they beat the Yankees, 7-3, in Game 2 of the ALCS. Kansas City southpaw Paul Splittorff, pitching 5.2 innings in relief, is credited with the victory.

1978      The Yankees obtain Dave Righetti along with Juan Beniquez, Mike Griffin, Paul Mirabella, and minor leaguer Greg Jemison from the Rangers for Mike Heath, Sparky Lyle, Larry McCall, Dave Rajsich, Domingo Ramos and cash. The 19 year-old southpaw, who will toss a July 4th no-hitter in 1983, will spend 11 seasons with the Bronx Bombers, compiling a 74-61 (.548) record and saves 224 games for the team.

1978      Prior to the start of Game 1 of the World Series, the Dodgers retire the uniform #19 of Jim Gilliam, their coach who died suddenly two days ago as the result of a massive brain hemorrhage. The 37 year-old former All-Star LA infielder will become the team’s first player not inducted into the Hall of Fame to receive this honor.

1982      The Brewers become the first team to overcome an 0-2 start in a best of a five-game LCS and take the American League pennant by winning the remaining three games against the Angels.

1993      Chicago slugger Frank Thomas is selected as the American League’s Most Valuable Player. The first baseman, who ranked among the top ten of the league’s nine offensive categories, batted .317 with 41 home runs and knocked in 128 runs for the division-winning White Sox.

1999      Scoring more than 19 NFL teams, the Red Sox establish a major league record for most runs and biggest margin of victory in a postseason game as they rout the Indians, 23-7, to tie the 5-game series at two games apiece.

2000      In a 2-0 Seattle victory, the Mariners (9) and Yankees (13) combined for 22 strikeouts to set an ALCS record in Game 1 of the series.

2003      The Cubs take a 2-1 game advantage in the NLCS when they beat the Marlins in extra innings at Pro Player Stadium, 5-4. The eventual winning run scores in the top of the 11th when Doug Glanville triples off Florida’s Brandon Looper to plate Kenny Lofton, who had singled after the first out was made in the frame.

2003      With six hits in six consecutive at-bats, Kenny Lofton sets an NLCS record and ties the ALCS mark. Gary Matthews (Phillies-1983), Will Clark (Giants-1989), Steve Buechele (Pirates-1991), and Javy Lopez (Braves-1996) all held the previous NL distinction with five consecutive hits, and Paul Molitor (Blue Jays-1993) established the major league standard, now shared with the Cub flychaser, with reaching safely six times in six consecutive at-bats.

2005      Although the Phillies (88-74) have had three straight winning seasons and missed a chance of being the wild card by one game this season, Ed Wade is fired as the team’s general manager. Philadelphia has not played in the postseason for 12 consecutive years, including the last eight seasons with Wade calling the shots.

2005      Rafael Palmeiro is spared perjury charges when a Congressional subcommittee decides to not prosecute him following its investigation. The former Orioles’ first baseman/DH had piqued the legislators’ interest when he tested positive for steroids four months after pointing his finger at the committee during a Capitol Hill hearing, emphatically denying that he had used performance enhancing substances.

2008      Prior to the start of Game 2 of the NLDS, Phillies’ manager Charlie Manuel is informed his mother had died earlier in the day at a Virginia hospital after a brief illness. The grieving skipper, one of ten of June’s children, stays with the team and directs his club to an 8-5 victory against the Dodgers at Citizens Bank Park.

2009      In Matt Holliday’s first at-bat at home since his critical error allowed LA to stage an amazing comeback victory, the Cardinals’ left fielder receives a standing ovation from the sellout crowd of 47,296 at Busch Stadium. The former NLCS MVP award winner (Colorado – 2007), who will become a free agent after the season, is touched by the fans’ reaction and very appreciative of their support.

2009      The Dodgers advance to their second consecutive National League championship series, beating St. Louis 5-1 to complete a three-game sweep of the Redbirds in the NLDS. Solid pitching by late-season pick-up Vicente Padilla and timely hitting by Andre Ethier, who had three extra-base hits, and Manny Ramirez, who broke out of a slump with three hits and two RBIs, close out the series, which will be best remembered for the team’s dramatic Game 2 comeback when Matt Holliday’s error on James Loney’s ninth-inning two-out line drive leads to a stunning two-run walk-off rally.

2010      Behind the solid starting pitching of Roy Halladay, Roy Oswalt, and Cole Hamels, the Phillies complete the franchise’s first playoff sweep when Hamels throws a complete-game, five-hit 2-0 NLDS victory over the Reds at Great American Ball Park. Philadelphia will have an opportunity to become the first team to win three consecutive National League pennants since the war-time Cardinals raised flags from 1942 to 1944.

2011      Ranger left fielder Nelson Cruz hits the first walk-off grand slam in major league playoff history when his 11th inning round-tripper beats Detroit, 7-3, in Game Two of the ALCS. The victory in Arlington gives Texas a 2-0 advantage in the seven-game series.

 

THIS DAY IN SPORTS HISTORY-OCTOBER 10, 1926

In the seventh inning of Game 7 of the World Series between the Yankees and the Cardinals at Yankee Stadium, St. Louis was leading by 3‚2 with two outs, but New York had the bases loaded. It was the last great Yankees rally of the Series. The Cardinals’ second baseman and manager, Rogers Hornsby, summoned a famous pitcher, well past his prime at 39, to relieve Jesse Haines and face the dangerous 22-year-old rookie Tony Lazzeri.

NEW YORK-Forty thousand pairs of eyes peered anxiously through the gray mist toward the bullpen out in deep left. There was a breathless pause, and then around the corner of the stand came a tall figure in a Cardinal sweater. His cap rode rakishly on the corner of his head. He walked like a man who was going nowhere in particular and was in no hurry to get there. He was a trifle knock-kneed and his gait was not a model of grace and rhythm.
Any baseball fan would have known him a mile away. It was Grover Cleveland Alexander. Alexander the Great was coming in to pull the Cardinal machine out of the mudhole. The ancient twirler, who had gone nine full innings the day before, was shuffling in where younger men feared to tread.
On any other day he would have been sitting contentedly on the bench, chewing his quid and ruminating on life. This time he was plucked out from the bullpen and thrust into the limelight as the last hope of the Cardinals. He warmed up in that leisurely, methodical way of his, and as he faced Tony Lazzeri, fresh young slugger from the Coast, he was outwardly as unconcerned as if it were a spring exhibition game. Throughout the park there came a silence. The fans slid forward to the edge of their seats. Hardly a mother’s son of them seemed to be moving a muscle, but old Alex was undisturbed.
He had been through all that before. Apparently there wasn’t a nerve in his body. Ball one to Lazzeri was low and the crowd stirred, but Alex calmly carved the outside corner with a strike, like a butcher slicing ham. Another one outside and Lazzeri fouled it into the stand. The Yankee was now in the hole. “This lad is in a tighter fix than I am,” thought Alex, and so he essayed a low curve that one of the Singer midgets couldn’t have hit. Lazzeri swung and missed. The deed was done. Alex took off his glove and shuffled again to the bench. The Cardinals, young and impetuous, pounded his back and hugged him madly, but old Alex took it with placid good humor-not the shadow of a smile on his face.
Only once did he turn his head and send a half-smile toward the stand and we suspect that that was his only gesture of triumph.